Skip To Main Content

Employment

Sayre School embraces and respects the diversity of backgrounds, outlooks, and talents individuals bring to its community.  We welcome candidates celebrating the diversity of the world in our educational program, admission policies, staff hiring, and other school-administered programs. 

Careers

Sayre School seeks employees eager to join an educational community that values empowering students in their intellectual, social and emotional development.

We offer the opportunity to teach the way you always wanted to teach. You’ll find small classes, an administration that encourages creativity and collaboration, and interesting colleagues devoted to their profession. Our joyful, inquisitive, and self-confident students approach their school experience with curiosity, passion, and engagement. We view all of our employees as role models and mentors in guiding our students through their educational journey.

Sayre School actively seeks qualified individuals with diverse backgrounds and talents who will make a positive contribution to school life. Sayre School does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, uniform service member status, religion, handicap or disability, or any other protected status in accordance with all federal, state, or local law. This applies to its educational policies, employment policies, admissions policies, financial-aid policies, athletics, and other after-school programs.

LOCATION

Our campus is nestled in Lexington’s historic district which is at the center of a vibrant urban core that is attracting businesses and young families to live and work in the area. Sayre School is walking distance to the University of Kentucky and Transylvania University as well as a rich array of galleries, theatres and restaurants. Our campus features a unique blend of original historic structures, green space, and award-winning contemporary architecture.

LEXINGTON

VisitLex.com

Planning to move to the Horse Capital of the World? What are your interests? Horses? History? Outdoor activities? Arts and culture? Bourbon? Lexington is Kentucky's showplace and the heart of the Bluegrass Region.   Read more about Lexington at VisitLex.com.

New York Times

For years, Downtown Lexington was an afterthought to everything around it — two universities, a ring of homey residential neighborhoods and, in the rolling bluegrass hills surrounding the city, world-class horse farms. Basketball fans would go into town for University of Kentucky home games, and horse owners would gather at the few nice restaurants when the big horse sales in the area were underway. But otherwise, downtown was a stodgy precinct of banks, law offices and not much else.  By Jack Healy and Campbell Robertson, Meet Me Downtown, October 2022

That changed in the 2010’s. Years of effort by civic boosters dovetailed with a nationwide rediscovery of urban living, and suddenly downtown Lexington was blooming. New bars, restaurants and coffeehouses proliferated; old bank buildings were repurposed into boutique hotels; old distilleries started making bourbon again; and developers put up glassy high-rises. There were plans for a $300 million renovation of the city’s convention center and basketball arena.

Beyond the track, much is changing in Lexington, the capital of American horse country and the 15-county Bluegrass Region. New locavore restaurants and whiskey distillery revivals add post-race appeal, as do thoroughbred farms themselves.  "In Lexington, Selfies With American Pharoah, Then ‘Bourbon and Branch’" By Elaine Glusac 

The Washington Post

The city includes many of the staples of the new American South: the artisanal goods (in particular, ice cream), the mixture of boutiques and newly installed high-end shopping, the intense homegrown pride, the hipster bars and outdoor music festivals. Its pleasures, though, stretch far beyond the beltway that encircles the city. "Lexington: The bucolic Kentucky city is fiercely proud of its omnipresent horses and bourbon, but modernity is creeping in." By Travis M. Andrews Oct. 17, 2018